I’m…on…TV!

Next Thursday, 9 June, an episode of “Known Universe” will air on the National Geographic Channel entitled “Construction Zone,” about the ways humans build things in space – or might build them in the future. For a couple-minute segment about future space construction technologies, the host and crew came to my Cornell research lab and filmed a bit with me about my flux-pinning technology research!

I’m excited and nervous – excited, because this is my first real TV appearance, it’s all about the cool possibilities that could come from my graduate research, and I want to see how it comes out – but nervous, because as a researcher, I know what kind of story I want to tell about my subject, and I don’t know if it will come out the same way after editing. I know what footage we shot, but I haven’t seen the finished product yet!

For now, I can say this: I had a blast filming. Explaining the concepts to the host and doing demonstrations with him was a lot of fun. I think there was plenty of footage that made my research come across well.

The only downside is that I don’t have cable in my new apartment!

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4 Responses to I’m…on…TV!

  1. Mary Griffin says:

    We are going to watch it! I am very excited for you Joseph! Good luck

  2. Mary Griffin says:

    Congratulations on your TV debut! The whole program was very interesting. I know your parents are very proud of you!

    I work at an elementary school and I coordinate live video conference experiences for our students with NASA. I hope to encourage kids to go into careers that use math and science skills. You are in inspiration. Best of luck to you as you continue on in your career.

  3. Mason Peck says:

    You knocked it out of the park, as we all knew you would. Great job. And for those of you who hadn’t guessed, Joe’s original video (http://www.youtube.com/user/scengr#p/u/25/lfZ_qtG6xPw) was NGC’s inspitation for their animation of the transforming rocket/spacecraft. Joe more accurately depicted the system as one that spins, an important feature both for the reconfiguration physics and for the flight operations.

  4. Joseph says:

    Thank you! I’m glad things came out as well as they did.

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